Category: epistemic innocence

Superstitious Confabulations

In this post, Anna Ichino, Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of Milan, working primarily in the philosophy of mind and philosophical psychology, continues our series of research posts on the special issue in Topoi, introducing her paper “Superstitious confabulations“.  Confabulation is a...

Gaslighting, Confabulation, and Epistemic Innocence

Our series of posts on confabulation continues, featuring papers that appear in a special issue of Topoi on the topic, guest edited by Sophie Stammers and Lisa Bortolotti. Today’s post, on gaslighting, confabulation, and epistemic innocence, is by Andrew Spear, Philosophy Faculty...

Philosophical Perspectives on Confabulation

Have you ever explained something that you believe or that you’ve done in a way that felt appropriate and meaningful at the time, but which, on reflection, you might have realized was a little…well…made up? You’re not alone! ‘Confabulation’, first studied...

Epistemic Innocence and the Overcritical Juror

In this post, Katherine Puddifoot, Assistant Professor in the Department of Philosophy at Durham University, discusses her paper “Re-evaluating the credibility of eyewitness testimony: the misinformation effect and the overcritical juror,” recently published in Episteme. Should we trust eyewitnesses of crimes?...