Category: two-factor theory

Explaining Delusional Beliefs: a Hybrid Model

In this post Kengo Miyazono (Hiroshima) and Ryan McKay (Royal Holloway) summarise their new paper “Explaining delusional beliefs: a hybrid model”, in which they present and defend a hybrid theory of the development of delusions that incorporates the central ideas of two influential (yet sometimes...

Phil Corlett’s response to Ryan McKay

In this post, Phil Corlett replies to Ryan McKay‘s summary of his paper “Measles, Magic and Misidentifications: A Defence of the Two-Factor Theory of Delusions“, itself a response to Phil’s earlier post on his paper “Factor one, familiarity and frontal cortex:...

Measles, Magic and Misidentifications

I’m Ryan McKay, Professor of Psychology at Royal Holloway, University of London, and head of the Royal Holloway Morality and Beliefs Lab (MaB-Lab). I’m interested in how we form and revise beliefs, including delusional beliefs. This post is a summary of...

Factor One, Familiarity and Frontal Cortex

In this post, Phil Corlett, Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Yale School of Medicine, discusses some of the ideas in his paper ‘Factor one, familiarity and frontal cortex: a challenge to the two-factor theory of delusions’ recently published in the Journal of Cognitive Neuropsychiatry....

Epistemic Innocence at ESPP

In September 2018, a team of Birmingham philosophers, comprising Kathy Puddifoot, Valeria Motta, Matilde Aliffi, EmaSullivan-Bissett and myself, were in sunny Rijeka, Croatia, to talk a whole lot of Epistemic Innocence at the European Society for Philosophy and Psychology. Epistemic innocence...

Intensity of Experience and Delusions in Schizophrenia

This post is by Eisuke Sakakibara, psychiatrist working at The University of Tokyo Hospital. In this post he writes about his paper “Intensity of experience: Maher’s schizophrenic delusion revisited” recently published in Neuroethics. Delusion is one of the most frequently discussed themes in...

A Two-factor Account of False Body Size Beliefs in Anorexia Nervosa

Stephen Gadsby is a PhD candidate in the Cognition and Philosophy lab, Monash University. His research spans a number of topics, including anorexia nervosa, body representation, delusions, psychiatric taxonomy, mental representation and predictive processing. In this post, he summarises his new paper “Self-Deception and the...